http://journal.moseskotaneinstitute.com/index.php/Journals/issue/feed Moses Kotane Institute Journal 2024-04-11T20:42:50+02:00 Managing Editor mkijournal@moseskotane.com Open Journal Systems <p>The <strong><em>Moses Kotane Institute Journal</em></strong> (MKIJ) is an online open-access journal, established informally in 2020 by the Moses Kotane Institute. In 2021, the journal rebranded and was formalized to publish at least two issues per year continuously on article-by-article. MKIJ publishes both theoretical and empirical economic research focusing primarily on six sectors: Information Communication Technology (ICT), Maritime and Ocean Economy, Manufacturing, Agriculture, Rural and Township Economy, and Green Economy.</p> http://journal.moseskotaneinstitute.com/index.php/Journals/article/view/26 An assessment of the state of access to digital technologies in rural and township areas: The case of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa 2023-06-29T19:17:09+02:00 Xolani Ngema drxtngema@gmail.com <p>Digital technology is widely embraced as a catalyst for human development advancement and an essential factor in the general course of human civilization. However, there is major concern regarding accessibility in developing nations as the adoption and implementation of digital technology and resultant innovations go hand in hand with the developmental state of the context within which they occur. Apart from being the second largest region in terms of total population, KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) is among South Africa’s leading economic hubs and a major contributor towards the country’s gross domestic product (GDP). As a cardinal component of fourth industrial revolution (4IR), digital technology has demonstrated capacity to create new economies. Most rural and township areas are still characterized by abject poverty, severe income disparities, and high unemployment rate post fourth industrial revolution (4IR) adoption. These are the socio-economic dynamics to which a systematic divide that continues to deprive most inhabitants of resource constrained areas access to digital technologies has been generally ascribed. Regardless, there is a pressing need for establishing factors by which technology acquisition is hindered as each geographical region is unique in terms of disparity or parity. As literature suggests, determining existing gap in the use of digital technology between individuals, regions or countries remains key initiative in effective policy and strategy formulation and development processes. Accordingly, this article particularly examined the state of access to digital technologies in the rural and township areas of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN). Empirical findings indicate significant contribution of digital technologies towards socio-economic benefits. Nonetheless, there is huge backlog in terms of internet connectivity and equitable income distribution as most communities could not afford prepaid data bundles. Thus, it is recommended that initiatives and strategies such as broadband rollout and visibility of Moses Kotane Institute’s centres should be taken or developed to improve access to digital technologies among inhabitants.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> 2024-04-11T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The views expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the funder, MKIJ or the author’s affiliated institution(s). MKIJ will not be liable to any person for inaccurate information or opinions contained herein. http://journal.moseskotaneinstitute.com/index.php/Journals/article/view/12 Rural Small-scale Dairy Production Systems in South Africa Challenges Potentials and Opportunities for Improvement 2021-12-08T10:13:17+02:00 Nkosinathi Xulu mthinayi123@gmail.com <p>Rural small-scale dairy farming and milk production remain the economic backbone of rural household food security in sub-Saharan Africa although its contribution is a simple 2% in global milk production. In places such as India, Kenya, and Zambia rural small-scale dairy farmers play a significant role in the production and supply of milk. South Africa alone has been contributing 0.5% to global milk production because of the decline of about 41% in the year 1997 due to a drop in the number of commercial farmers and the increase of population. Unfortunately, South African rural small-scale dairy farmers have not yet reached that stage, because of various challenges including lack of support, limited knowledge, and practices of hygiene and safety which exposes milk to contamination with both spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. The compromised quality of milk could affect its optimum utilization for improved food and nutrition security. These constraints provide major opportunities and challenges for research and development to increase dairy production, efficient management of natural resources, and improved livelihoods of poor farmers.</p> 2024-04-11T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The views expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the funder, MKIJ or the author’s affiliated institution(s). MKIJ will not be liable to any person for inaccurate information or opinions contained herein. http://journal.moseskotaneinstitute.com/index.php/Journals/article/view/29 Shipping and ports as drivers of South African economic growth: A systematic literature review 2024-04-11T20:42:50+02:00 Thobekile Mthembu Thobekile7@hotmail.com Sanele Gumede gumedes@ukzn.ac.za <p>Seaports are evolving to serve as isolated locations overseeing ships and as pivotal hubs integrated into worldwide supply chains and global transportation networks. This study analyses how shipping and port operations contribute to South Africa’s economic expansion and the creation of jobs in the maritime sector. While South Africa’s productive and rich coastal waters add vast millions to the national economy and support many jobs yearly, the nation continues to underperform in the shipping industry. This study adopted desktop analysis and inductive content analysis to establish how South Africa’s participation in the shipping industry promotes economic growth, how the maritime sector can, directly and indirectly, contribute to job creation, and the correlation between South Africa’s port volumes and economic growth. The study focused on reputable government and scientific publications, the full texts of relevant articles, and shipping and port activity reports.</p> <p>The main findings are that, by positioning itself as the most preferred maritime partner in Africa, South Africa’s shipping and port activities can contribute to expanding the national economy and creating more employment in the maritime industry. South Africa must, nonetheless, leverage the prevailing participative covenants with other shipping nations, skills training, and full participation in maritime logistics, value chains, on and offshore support, vessel, and port operations for the shipping and port activities to effectively contribute to the expansion of the South African economy and the creation of jobs in the maritime sector. To successfully compete with other shipping nations, the ports in South Africa require contemporary technological infrastructure. Improved research and assessment of innovation, financing, and investment activities will aid the nation in ascertaining the most capable ocean sectors, subsectors, and shipping projects to increase private sector investment.</p> 2024-04-11T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The views expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the funder, MKIJ or the author’s affiliated institution(s). MKIJ will not be liable to any person for inaccurate information or opinions contained herein. http://journal.moseskotaneinstitute.com/index.php/Journals/article/view/25 A clash of policies for a marine protected area: a case for South African Marion island 2023-06-27T14:25:32+02:00 Knowledge Bengu 216076993@stu.ukzn.ac.za Sanele Gumede gumedes@ukzn.ac.za <p>Marion Island, one of the two Prince Edward Islands in the southern Indian Ocean, is located about 1 190 miles (1 920 km) southeast of Cape Town. In 1947 South Africa proclaimed the islands’ sovereignty and established a meteorological station on Marion Island in 1948. These islands and their surroundings are the breeding ground for various fish and bird species. Given the pristine ecological nature of these islands, they enjoy the highest protection available under South African Legislation. It is required that foreign seagoing vessels that arrive or depart from these islands comply with the legislative frameworks that protect them. This study investigated the legal framework that supports the conservation of this island. The qualitative research method was used to help provide an in-depth description of the subject matter. A systematic literature review was conducted to assess the impact of the declaration of Marion Island as a marine protected area (MPA). The findings revealed that the Constitution of the RSA, the Environment Conservation Act, the Maritime Zones Act, the Marine Living Resources, the Protected Areas Act, the Waste Act, and the Air Quality Act are pivotal legal frameworks that govern the conservation of the islands. The study identified the Customs Control Act No. 31 of 2014, the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act No. 3 of 2000, and the Customs and Excise Act No. 91 of 1964 as conflicting laws that regulate the declaration of goods and services destined for Marion Island. This study is unique as it provides a better understanding of these contradictory laws. To address the discrepancies in these conflicting pieces of Legislation, the study recommends that government initiates public education and awareness programmes.</p> 2024-04-11T00:00:00+02:00 Copyright (c) 2024 The views expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent those of the funder, MKIJ or the author’s affiliated institution(s). MKIJ will not be liable to any person for inaccurate information or opinions contained herein.